Timeline

1985

The idea of an international collaboration is proposed at the Geneva Superpower Summit by General Secretary Gorbachev of the former Soviet Union to US President Ronald Reagan.

1986

On Reykjavik summit an agreement is reached between the European Union (Euratom), Japan, the Soviet Union, and the USA to jointly pursue the design for a large international fusion facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).
The flags of the seven ITER Members — China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United States — fly over the worksite. (Credit © ITER Organization, http://www.iter.org/)

The flags of the seven ITER Members — China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United States — fly over the worksite.

1988

Work on the ITER design started.

1992

Conceptual Design Activities on ITER are finished and three possible locations are suggested: San Diego (USA), Garching, Germany (Euratom), and Naka (Japan).

1998

Final design of the ITER is approved.

2003

The choice for the location of the ITER Project narrowed to Cadarache, France, and Rokkasho-Mura, Japan.

2005

After a period of high-level political negotiations, the decision to locate the ITER in Cadarache, France, is reached.

2006

Signature of the ITER Agreement. ITER members are China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States.

2007

Formal creation of the ITER Organization.

2007—2009

Work begin at the ITER site. Land clearing and levelling progresses. In 2009 the platform is ready for the scientific buildings and facilities of the ITER Project.

2008

Work begins on the ITER Itinerary: a 104-kilometre-long specially modified route from the port of Berre l’Etang to Cadarche for convoys with exceptionally heavy, large components for the ITER machine.

2008—2021

Manufacturing of principal First Plasma components.

2010—2014

Ground support structure and seismic foundations for the Tokamak built.

2010—2021

Construction of the ITER plant and auxiliary buildings for First Plasma.

2012

Nuclear licensing milestone: the ITER becomes a Basic Nuclear Installation under French law.

2012

Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility finished. In this 257-metre-long facility, the winding and assembly operations for five of the ITER’s giant poloidal field coils will take place at the beginning of 2013.

2014—2021

Construction of the Tokamak Building. From 2017, the Assembly Hall is accessible for installation activities; in 2018 access to Tokamak Pit is open.

2015—2023

Largest components are transported along the ITER Itinerary.

2020

First 360-tonne toroidal field coil delivered to the ITER site.

2020—2025

Main assembly phase I.

2021

First magnet, poloidal field coil #6, installed.

2022

Welding of vacuum vessel will start.

2025

Cryostat will be closed.

2026

First plasma is expected.

2025—2035

Progressive ramping-up of the machine.

2035

Deuterium-Tritium Operation begins.

2050

Probable beginning of the ITER decommissioning.
ITER building site. (Credit © ITER Organization, http://www.iter.org/)

ITER building site.